YOUR STORIES

 

The stories below are from Australia’s community of carers and other Australians who acknowledge and appreciate their remarkable efforts.

 

  • Salome

    VIC
    I've been assisting my beloved, precious Mother for about 18 years, but unfortunately she passed last year leaving me devastated and needing to take her place in caring full-time for my elderly father and two brothers. I have to say it's been a full-fledged nightmare! I knew if I ever lost my amazing Mother I'd be in a terrible situation. The problem is I cannot abandon them, especially not my father, otherwise they'd be totally and unequivocally lost. Nothing prepared me for the daily onslaught of cooking, cleaning, shopping, etc... I'm exhausted but I still care.
  • Elizabeth Brett

    VIC
    I care for two children with Aspergers Syndrome and chronic health problems. Due to their special needs, they are unable to attend mainstream school. Their is no element of choice about this, their lives would be endangered if they did. So, they are home schooled. Why do I care? Well, although there isn't a choice, I am happy to do it because I want them to have what they need. I just wish the NDIS would provide some help for carers. I have not had much respite this year due to poor funding under the NDIS. As a result, my health has suffered. I was better off before the NDIS.
  • Chantel Arianna Lobban

    SA
    My name is chantel, I’m 26 years old I’m a single mum and my son is the love of my life, Jake was born with a encephalocele on the back of his head, his brain grew into it, they removed half of Jakes brain and the bit he does have has abnormal brain tissue and fluid. Jake cannot walk Jake cannot talk, Jake has learnt to wheel his wheelchair! Jake loves music. Jakes still in nappies and I’m his full time carer, from feeding him to singing to him every day, I am truly blessed to have a little boy who survived when doctors said he couldn’t, he has eyes bluer then the oceon but Jake is blind.
  • Jenny T

    VIC
    I care for my mother, who has chronic depression, catering to her emotional and day to day needs since I was young and advocate on her behalf as she doesn't speak English. My relationship with my mum is difficult as she has difficulty showing affection. Most of the time, caring for her is very hard and not rewarding because I'm a full-time uni student and we do not always connect. During better periods, she does not think she has any health problems and has no memory of periods where she was very ill. I care because she is my mum and I want her to live as happy and comfortable as possible.
  • Marsene

    SA
    I care for my daughter who is five she is completely immobile and she is in a wheelchair and she can't speak she is also incontinent and peg fed.
  • Judy Anderson

    VIC
    Caring for my daughter who has a mental illness and finds all the activities she used to be able to do are very difficult now. She is a veteran and a beautiful girl whose dreams have been shattered by this hideous illness. She is recovering well but will never recover fully. She is a much loved family member and needs all the love and care we can give her to enable her to make the best recovery she can. The trauma we all went through while trying desperately to get her help when she was very ill, still sits with us now and will never go away. There need to be more help.
  • Roslyn Stewart

    VIC
    Mother
  • Sandra Lupton

    QLD
    I care because life is far to short not to. At the moment I have two brothers who have illnesses that at times is very risky. One has Motor Neuro Disorder and the other one has Kidney Failure. I also look after a 84yr old lady named Pamela whom I adore who had a stroke 3yrs ago and has been left unable to walk without assistance plus she is unable to shower or dress herself. I take my hat off to anyone who takes on the role of a carer because it shows they care about their loved ones.
  • Julie Baldin

    NSW
    I care for my Dad who has Dementia and it’s hard but I couldn’t imagine anyone else caring for him, I’m still his baby girl and that keeps me hoping he still knows me. I also care for my brother who just turned 40 who has epilepsy and moderate intellectual disability and he keeps me on my toes but it is very rewarding as he makes me smile everyday. My live Has changed a lot but I still work 2 days a week and catch up with my friends and family every week so I have a great balance that helps me enjoy caring for my family members.
  • Mr Christopher Buhle

    QLD
    I care because i value human life...I care because her family doesn't...mental health is invisible to them ,as it is to government!...I care because everyone deserves dignity,respect and compassion,in this life...i care that she is able to smile and love herself when others fail to...i care that she should feel safe and protected...i care because i want to...i care because she is worthy...i care because importantly she needs care...but most of all i care because she is my friend...and friendship is the greatest gift of all.
  • Martine

    NSW
    I care for my husband with war service related mental health problems and ill health during and after his cancer treatment. I balance full time work and caring for him. I am blessed that he is still with me. Even when I'm tired and sad, I am blessed.
  • Clare Masolin

    WA
    23 years ago my son was born 10 weeks pre-term and we struggled to adjust to the new reality that a diagnosis of cerebral palsy would bring. Soon it was clear to me that those I met requiring care generally had a voice advocating on their behalf for anything necessary to survive, strive and to thrive. The needs of those who stood alongside these children were largely invisible or taken for granted - that they would always be there, always be strong, cheerful, thankful, selfless, unbroken. I care and speak up....FOR CARERS, who deserve not simply to survive, but to strive and to thrive.
  • Tina

    QLD
    Being a Carer is the most privileged position in the world! It is better than ANY job money could pay for! When you attend to the needs of a person, when at they are at their most vulnerable, there is nothing in the world that can better the feeling of being the privileged person that is able to help!
  • Kenya

    VIC
    I’m caring for my husband. He’s had cancer for the last 13 years. I retired from work 4 years ago. I’m glad I left work.
  • Anna

    QLD
    I care it’s the best Love I can express for my husband with cancer bedridden .Im beside 24/7.. no breaks/no outings from 7 months .Every moment is precious for him.And he finds me beside him gives him Comfort and joy .To keep the sick,disabled person happy ,fulfill their desires is the best I can do for him to live longer joyfully beside him .I love him more than anything in the world .For transition to be smooth or I go with him,holding hands together,taking our last breath together .Thats Why I care .Dont care about my own health .As when you care Unconditionally ,God takes care of the Carer
  • Nancy milosevich

    NSW
    I’m in care of my daughters 2 oldest children as she passed away 4 years ago. Ages now are 13, and 11, I’m all they have and they are striving for knowledge , doing well under their little life has dealt them. They make me proud to be nan.
  • Kathy Barnes

    WA
    Having been an unpaid Carer for my Mother, as much as I loved her there were times when I wished I wasn't her carer, the times when she got argumentive, or upset over some thing and I had to try and calm her down as there was no real reason for her to be upset, or any other thing. This is all part of a carers work and if we were heard more then more people would be prepared to care for a Family Member and cost the government less money.
  • MJ

    ACT
    My mum is 82 and has Alzheimer 's. She so wants to be as independent as ever, but she needs help with many things. So every couple of weeks I drive 230km (what a climate catastrophe!) and stay with her for a few days or weeks to take her to doctors, help with her house, bills, banking, get her to eat better, set up systems that help her to look after herself more easily, or whatever she needs. Other siblings do what they can but they are busy with their children or they live further away than I do.
  • Ange

    NSW
    My dad is my carer and he means the world to me He does everything for me and beyond without him and other Carers I don’t know how I wd b where I am today My parents lost my brother the day I was admitted to hospital, the next day I had to undergo major surgery. The day of my brothers funeral I received my devastating news/results. My parents had to bury my brother with knowing that they may have to bury myself too but bcz of my dad being my carer I have managed to become a survivor and my results have shown this! I love my dad and respect all Carers They r angels from heaven.
  • Patricia Lee-Leong

    QLD
    My father was a full time career for my mother after a number of tia and operations and he recently pass away. while options of mum going into a nursing home was looked at by a few when she went into respite care. The brothers and one of my sisters came up with a option to keep her home and do a rotation shift to look after her. Letting her live in her own home by the water and watch the boats and try and care for her while we could. Changing the lives of us all. She seems happy having time she gets with her kids and knowing we are watching out for her. We love and care
  • Elise Brown

    VIC
    One of the most amazing women I know is a mother / carer to her daughter who requires full support with her every day life. She also has 4 other children and is the heart and sole of our local pony club. Shit can hit the fan and She just gets head down bum up and works through it. She is an endless supply of cuddles and smiles. Hands down she is the most selfless people I know.
  • Anonymous

    NSW
    This week a very small lotto win that will almost clear my credit card debt. Appropriate for carers week. We don't get the money required to cover the kettle boiling all day, washing machine switched on every time my partner sees it, lights left on everywhere and she showers all day till there is no hot water for me. The cost of a fleet of cars as they break down I have to fix them as repairers cost too much and carer bonuses don't cover the annual vehicle maintenance remote area living is costly. Last 3 years i had a nervous breakdown no treatment or help. I'm better off anyway.
  • Aimée Ciantar

    VIC
    “I CARE because despite living in a world full of distractions & other pressures our generation needs to look after the elderly & give back to those who came before us.” I’m a 34yr single Mum of a toddler & in my late 20s I chose to give up not only my social life, my career & my sanity at times in order to do what I believe is the right thing to do & that’s to keep elderly citizens out of aged care comes & in their own homes to live a supported independent life style, where they want to be. It’s not easy & the struggle is real but it’s worth it because no one deserves to die feeling alone
  • Debra

    VIC
    I am the carer of my 47 year old brother who has an intellectual disability. There is no greater gift than love and I receive this gift every single day in the shape of a smile or a hug. Sometimes I wonder who is caring for whom?
  • Lina

    QLD
    I married my husband exactly a year ago, a very handsome man with so many abilities. Untill all sudden things changed. Six months after our wedding day, my husband got twisted bowel and ischemia, leading to 3 serious surgeries to remove part of his small intestines, duodenum, and colon. He had to stay in paliative care for 6 months. Now he is home, and I become his main carer. Despite his loss ability to do things on his own, he is still my strong man in my eye. I know he is not the same man whom I married a year ago, but my love to him is still the same, that's why I care.
  • Richard FitzGerald

    VIC
    I care for my son. No-one else will do it (care) quite the same.I am doing it while I can, God knows who will care after that.My son is having the best years now. ...not later. I care because he doesn't understand his medical condition, and he never will. * He cannot tel me or a doctor about his medical condition. He self-harms to avoid psychological pain; but on the other hand, he knows physical pain. He has a fear of doctors and what he doesn't understand they will do for him.He will hurt them first and avoid healing treatments. What to do? Eventually, he will be a 'child' of the State. *
  • Anna Knoght

    QLD
    My husband with Prostrate cancer Spread to his bones .Bedridden now .Even though we get carers coming from Wesley Mission Daily for few hours to give support .Im caring for 22 hrs/ day/night .From seven months I’m on sofa recliner ,sleep deprived,Me level 4 client ,but hardly get any care as all hours given to him .He is bedridden..Building his boat as his hobby .I love him,will do anything to keep him going.Inspite of my severe health conditions .I Love to Care .Hope there were some families here to support .It can be lonesome .I write,paint,7 months haven’t gone out Alone .Love him very much
  • Amy

    QLD
    Because they are people who deserve love and life just as much as the next person (despite what the government suggests by only paying $8/d to keep these beautiful people happy and healthy).
  • anonymous

    NSW
    Because no one else does, I'm a carer with a spinal injury can't work lost the ability to walk a couple of times so I am entilted to a pension anyway so that means I get $8.00 per day to give 24 hours a day care 7 days a week I have been caring for 37 years 22 on the books, I cannot get more than 3 days respite as I Don't want to put my partner into hospital if I want a break. Disability insurance scheme what a joke haven't seen a cent, and there are basicly no services where I live or theres alot of deaf ears. I also had to keep caring while I had and recovered from a stroke no help
  • Duncan Beckerton

    QLD
    My wife Anna, is a carer for me. I was diagnosed with MS about 10 years ago, since then i've had to stop work, not only has my wife had to financially support me, she's had to drag me up off the floor, she helps when i' forget my meds and i'm crook for days, she's even fed me. This sort of stuff is only done by special people, people who care and people like my special Anna, someone who loves unconditionally. That's just one of the many reasons i love her. Duncan Beckerton
  • Jane Polacco

    VIC
    Never really understood the question "Why do I care" Honestly I never considered it a choice. I care because I love my Mum &I want her to have the best possible quality of life. I access services on her behalf various organisation. She has needed care since I was 21 but I became her full time Carer in 2010 when her needs had escalated causing her to require greater assistance with the activities of daily living.My Mum is now 90. Physically she is legally blind, profoundly deaf and in a wheelchair but her zest for life remains undiminished. Though her body be frail her spirit is strong.
  • Rebecca

    QLD
    I care for my 17 year old son with Autism. As a solo parent I have found it to be the hardest job ever as it comes with isolation and very little social life. The smallest of achievements are celebrated with so much pride and joy. I love my son with all my heart and that's why I care for him.
  • Vania

    VIC
    My daughter Bailey has Down Syndrome. She makes me appreciate the little things in life and has made me a more patient person. She is friendly, compassionate, loves music and dancing. It’s a tough gig being a carer, it’s stressful, emotional, exhausting and frustrating, but ultimately it’s fulfilling, especially when she reaches her milestones! To all the carers out there- keep on, keeping on!
  • Daniel

    QLD
    I’m a carer for my daughter. I was asked to give a speech a few weeks ago on my personal experience as a carer and to highlight the need for us to have time to ourselves. This video is the same speech, please feel free to share if you feel appropriate. https://youtu.be/FMgNBKv8oyw
  • fiona sandercock

    SA
    Simply someone needs to care ! Support the Carers , in many roles parners , husbands , wifes , parents , children , and many with complex issues from babies to adults in age and elderly! The Carers need and deserve recognition ! I have noticed Carers are very different people for and from their experience of their Caring role COMPASSIONATE . Just where would one be without these individuals ,whom do the Caring ? BlessIngs to you all from myself .
  • Bernadette Stephenson

    VIC
    Our 31 year old daughter, who is a single parent and a recovering heroine addict, has Stage 4 agressive metastatic breast cancer and both she and her 5 year old and 2 year old boys permanently live in our care at our home. I previously cared for both of my dear parents living in their own home, before our lives changed dramatically. Both my husband and I are 66 years old and realise that in an ideal world our daughter could live independently with assisted caring support, whilst we would continue to raise her 2 children in a safe and stable home and environment. At times we feel overwhelmed.
  • Maree O'Reilly

    NSW
    I am also a carer for my elderly parents. My father has alzheimers and a chronic back injury where he can hardly move, doesn't sleep at night, he sleeps only 2 hours in the afternoon. My mother has Parkinsons Disease. I also work 15 hours per week. I can understand how other carers feel as though they are carrying the workload alone and the other siblings in the family don't live close by so the carer is not receiving the support from the family members and is silently suffering emotionally. Unlike the Campbell sisters who have family members helping each other especially emotionally.
  • Pam Ressom

    VIC
    I have a 28 year old daughter with Down Syndrome, I am a carer because I couldn't bear to part with her when she was born, and still cant. Sometimes we have hurdles to jump (or struggle over) but we do it together, also with the support of my amazing partner who also helps to care for me. Lost my Mum 2 years ago who always taught me in a caring and loving manner and I believe this comes full circle. We are all stronger for the opportunity to care.
  • Georgia

    QLD
    6 years ago my father in-law had a stroke leaving him completely paralysed down his right side. Through months of intense therapy and on going therapy and rehabilitation he is able to live at home. A once strong independent man who wouldn’t dare ask for help, he is now fragile, scared to live alone, has more falls then I can count and struggles with normal day to day tasks such as cooking and at times self care. I care because he cared for everyone else his whole life. I care because he needs me. I care because I love him. I care because he is my children’s grandpa. I care because he is dad.
  • Emily Renolds

    QLD
    I am not a carer but my fiance cares for me, he's too shy to do this but I will be brave for him, I have epilepsy, asd, bipolar and ptsd and Michael is the most amazing carer and support I have ever had, I have come further with improving my health and everything about me in the 12 months he has been looking after me than I ever have with 5 years of paid support, Michael is my everything and I don't know what I would do without him as he has just become my power of attorney also. I would be a mess if I ever lost him.
  • Angela Lennon

    VIC
    My husband is my carer but he won’t come on and say anything so I am doing it on his behalf.I have progressive MS and am wheelchair bound . He does everything for me and he is my hero . I don’t know what I’d do without him
  • Sally Whitehead

    NSW
    I made a promise to my parents that I would keep them at home as long as possible. I went on to have 5 children, but I was determined to keep my promise. My partner suffered an accident at work and I became his carer while raising my children. My father's health deteriorated and I move back home to care for mum and dad as well as my partner and the kids. For 9 years I cared for my dad keeping him out of the system at home surrounded by family. Although my dad is now in care I am still a primary carer to my partner, my mum, and the kids. It is the hardest but most rewarding job.
  • Sandra

    VIC
    No choice. Nobody else will do it, or do it properly. My son does not have a good advocate, apart from me.
  • Janine

    VIC
    I worked in ages care for almost 30 years. In that time I loved and cared for many residents with Parkinson’s and was always inspired by their grit and determination. Three years ago my darling Mum was diagnosed with Parkinson’s and that closely followed with a Lewy Body dementia diagnosis. We had to watch our beautiful mum transform into a stranger and though we still loved her fiercely, she wasn’t the woman who raised us. Mum moved into the facility where I worked and the care my colleagues showed her during her palliation and eventual passing was exemplenary. Carers are unsung heroes
  • Lorraine McGeary

    VIC
    My husband was diagnosed with Parkinson’s 11years ago since then he has had dbs surgery and slowly has become worse I care for him because he needs me and I love him it’s a hard thing to do to go from wife to career
  • Kim Maurer

    NSW
    My 31 year old son has Cerebral Palsy, I recently took him down to the set of Home and Away. He has been watching for 21 years. I have to say that this would have to be the highlight of his life. I have always tried to treat my son like another other person is treated. He has volunteered at the local Woollies for 13 years. I have fought for the past 31 years to give my son the best quality of life. I recently converted my double garage into a granny flat for him, so with the support he needs he will eventually be able to live without the help of his mum. Well that is the plan for him anyway.
  • Peter rabbit

    VIC
    Cause I am nice
  • Cortney Black

    VIC
    My greatest reason for caring is my grandparents, who were always there for me as a child, but as I got older and as they got older, their ability to do all the things they once did, as well as their health, started to decline. Since then, I have done many things to help and support them which has, in turn, allowed me to give back to them.
  • Chloe Tourneur

    VIC
    My reason for caring is for my mum who is always there for me and always making sure I have the best things in life. She always cares for and my two younger siblings and she's always there no matter what. she's always willing to sacrifice and put any one before herself. And this is my reason for caring.
  • Alyssa Goodger

    VIC
    I have a friend who's older brother has an undiagnosed disability and requires help to do most tasks. Thats why I care.
  • Demi Whiteley

    TAS
    A decade ago my late father was diagnosed with MS, 5 years later his best friend was diagnosed with cancer and sadly lost his battle not long after. The third friend, and glue that held us all together is Anthony G (Coney) he made a promise to both of them to selflessly care for them during the time they needed him the most. He stayed true to his word up until the minute they both passed, and a majority of his care for Dad was unpaid and more than we ever expected. He went above and beyond and for that I can’t thank him enough!
  • Ashley Barnes

    NSW
    I became a full time carer when our daughter Piper was diagnosed with Infantile Spasms, microcephaly, global development delays, intellectual disabilities, cortical vision impairment and feeding issues. This wasnt a choice for me, but is my life and I wouldnt have it any other way! Piper has taught us so much in life and I'm so thankful she chose our family to care for her.
  • Denise Daday

    VIC
    I care for my friend James who suffers from anxiety and depression and is unable to go out of his home other than for short periods. It took me 18 months to find a service that would come to home to diagnose and give him meds and then another 6 months to get him to a GP. I do his shopping and most of the cooking because Hhe is my friend and I care and because there is no one else to help as most of his friends dont understand his illness. Caring for James has taught me patience and acceptance and I am a better person for it.
  • Lyn HEANEY

    VIC
    My husband is a vietnam veteran with problems, and needs someone to care for him to cope with most of life as well as physically at times.
  • Gail Ellis

    QLD
    Our son was born 33 years ago, he failed to thrive and at 8months old, was diagnosed as having a congenital disability. We have never been given a syndrome to know just what to expect, (for that I’m grateful). I have been his full time carer since birth and would not have it any other way. I live in fear of anything happening to me making me unable to care for him and I dread the thought of having to put him into care. He is really the light of my life and I can’t imagine life without him. In short, I’m his carer because I care and I don’t feel that anyone would give him the care that I do
  • Sally Robinson

    QLD
    I'm a carer for my son he is 13 years old he has hypoxic brain injury when he was 18 months old from allergic reaction to the immunisation needle I know how hard it is sometimes for other carers and the alone feeling it's hard when you don't get enough support in the communities and the responsibilities you have day today it is difficult for all carers because you forget about yourself sometimes and you think about everyone else around you and then you run yourself down and there's no one to turn to anxiety and the difficult that you overcome day today and you just keep on going .
  • Alana Kelly

    VIC
    I care for my son with autism who is 8 and has seperation anxiety. I care because he is my only child and a beautiful boy
  • Vicki Burke

    NSW
    I am my husband's full-time carer, he had a perforated Ulcers which burst, he also has a host of other elements. I care for him because he deserves it and I would not want him any where else.
  • Glenda Grant

    WA
    I have been a Carer for my husband for 20 years. He suffered permanent kidney failure in 1998, along with many other health issues and was in hospital for over 3 months in the beginning. He was on Dialysis for near on 5 years, then I was able to be a kidney donor to him and the transplant was in November 2002. The kidney was rejected late last year 2017and he is back on Dialysis. He also suffers Heart & Lung problems.
  • Resina Boyer

    VIC
    I care so that my daughter and son will experience a better life. They have choices to lead a life of hope and positive experiences. So that they live a normal life as possible.
  • Jocelyn Mander

    VIC
    Most Carers are give one on one support which is most effective for the mental and physical wellbeing of the people they care for- the personal touch means they are more empathetic and more understanding of the difficulties faced.
  • Alanna O'Connor

    VIC
    I care fir my cchildren with disabilities each have different disabilities of there own i also part time care for my aunt n my grandmother i do it because its just something ive always just done but now i do it because it makes my family feel great to know some1 is there to help and i feel good to know that im wanted Ive done it my entire life now it just feels like apart of who i am And apart of my lifestyle i do it because at the end of the day i know ive been there for so many who may not have anyone
  • Jessica Symes

    VIC
    I care for my daughter. I didn't identify as a carer for a long time, I'm still not sure I really do. The lines between being a mum and being a carer are blurred. Our first born has a life threatening heart condition, a component of a connective tissue disorder. Her vision, heart, mobility and joints are all affected. Mums help their babies with everything, it is only as she grows older I realise I am fulfilling a role that other parents don't need to (toileting help, rolling over at night, carrying when she is too tired to walk, minimising fall risks, medical PA and advocate).
  • Natasha Boudville

    WA
    I am 31 and a fulltime carer for my blind Grandmother who has a heap of ailment. By me carer for her, she able to stay in her own place instead of being up into an aged care facility. It has it challenges but I wouldn't have it any other way
  • Kelsey Aquilina

    ACT
    I'm a career for my mum who has arthritis and other co-morbiditys due to her arthritis and strokes. I care because because she deserves it! My mum is an amazing resilient woman who has taught me so much! I care because she matters! Giving her some sort of normal life and quality of life is worth every minute! Being a carer is hard and exhausting but so worth it to make a small difference! To all the carers out there you are doing an amazing job!
  • Mark A Lombard

    QLD
    I care for my elderly mum because she deserves it...before my dad passed away two years ago I made him a promise that I would look after her for him. At times it is challenging but I just think about what she has done for me, my siblings and my children and that gives me the motivation to continue caring and loving my mum. Love you mum!
  • Theresa K CAPPETTA

    WA
    I was privileged to be working for Shenton Park Rehabilitation Centre from 2008 to 2012 at the age of 69 to 72. This centre provided an excellent services for the varied disabled, and a variety of disabilities. Many times during my 4 year stint did I have reason to wonder "WHO CARES FOR THE CARER", be they helpers, wives, husbands, mothers, fathers, sister, or brothers, or indeed strangers. More and more was I witness to the heavy responsibility heaped on to the CARERS, which is what made me wonder "WHO CARES FOR THE CARERS"? I was also witness to the break up of many relationships.
  • Gillian Armstrong

    WA
    My sister in law nursed her own father at home.
  • Mary Bryant

    NSW
    Here is my blog on carring http://lovelistens.com/thought-of-the-day.php
  • Jacqui banovic

    NSW
    My son had a traumatic brain injury in 2001 as a result of this he no longer speaks or walks and needs 24 hour care .I wouldn't allow him to go into care so I have been looking after him.
  • Anthony Sanders

    VIC
    Caring for those that need caring fulfils a personal passion which was instilled by my step-parents. Thus I keep the strong structural moral compass of kindness towards helping those in need.
  • Colette Maraczy-Lawley

    VIC
    As both a formal and informal and professional care giver, I think we all have something to do with benefiting and covering for the unaccounted for costs of ill health, disability and changes associated with growth age and development across the lifespan. If we all informally care a little bit more for each other, we not only are sometimes given appreciation but feel the altruistic benefits and save our economy and ultimately way of life in Australia.
  • Declan

    NSW
    I have grown up with my younger cousin who has severe ceribal palsy watching my auntie care for him and seeing him be the happiest little man in the world no matter what the situation was inspired me to want to help others in his sort of situation so now of the age of 18 I’m currently a disability support worker loving my job. I’ve had people say it’s an easy job my hate goes off to any other carers you are all leadgends.
  • Debra Elliott

    VIC
    I care cause I’m a carer who looks after my husband who has a ABI and has lost quarter of his leg . He also has a intellectual disability. My eldest child has servere ADHD,and a ABI my middle child has ODD and my beautiful daughter has servere ADHD, ODD , autism and a intellectual disability, Dyslexia, Disclyia & dysclayia so I care for them all by myself sometimes it can be challenging
  • Georgina

    QLD
    I have been a full time carer for my daughter for the last 16 years. Love know no boundaries. She is my world and not only do I care for her but she teaches me along the way on just how strong people can be and how loving a person can be. She repays me by just smiling and showing me love like no other. I feel previallaged to be able to look after her. She is a gift.
  • Margaret Troyahn

    QLD
    My husband has COPD, Bronchiextisus (can’t spell it) and a few other lung diseases. He also has a dilated left ventricle of his heart. I am 73 and my husband is 78. I look after him 24/7 with a shower lady coming in 3 days a week. He coughs nearly all night, every night, so I don’t get a lot of sleep. We have been married over 53 years, I love him dearly and I feel exhausted. I will manage, we have a good support family that can help when get overwhelmed.
  • Natalie Clark

    QLD
    I care for the amazing job carers provide for disadvantaged people. Everyone deserves the right to feel a sense of belonging and a sense of self in our wonderful world. Carers need to be recognised for their outstanding work.
  • Kristy Daley

    NSW
    Our daughter is the most beautiful, happy, easy going girl and a loving sister to her two brothers. Caring is something we do as a family.
  • Ruth Leveson

    VIC
    I cared for my elderly mother who had dementia, but I also met people in the aged care industry who then went home from work and cared for adult children with special needs. Carers do a wonderful job out of love, but society doesn’t give them enough support or recognition
  • KATHLEEN Mary KAHANE

    WA
    I am not a carer myself but I care as my fiancée who I will marry on the 8th December this year has been my carer for nearly 18 years. she didn't feel she wanted anything out of it and she realised I needed to be looked after. She has sacrificed so much so she can meet the challenges of looking after me at times she has felt the pressure and no support she has managed to keep us both afloat when I am at my worst. She knows even from the lack of help she still wants to care for me and this is why I care.
  • Adua Merola

    VIC
    I care for my mum I find it very challenging and uplifting I sometimes find myself in difficult situations but I'm able to work them out caring his hard work but very satisfying I am vision impaired it is definitely a challenge for me the main thing is that Mum is well looked after at all times.
  • Jenny Sandercombe

    VIC
    Well basically I have no choice and I would never have envisaged that I would have been in this situation when I was younger. I cared for my partner of 26 years from his cancer diagnosis until his passing. I care for my two teenagers, one 18 who has had psychotic depression and many hospitalisations and the other who is 16 and has autism and depression. It is exhausting, humbling and isolating all at the same time!
  • Hayley Boyfield

    QLD
    Selfless support that Carers provide, some of the most beautiful people I have met!
  • Borko Lucic

    VIC
    My wife has some form of cerebral palsy and she is not in a wheelchair but still need a care. Having a healthy child is giving her an absolute pleasure and happiness but in the same time a lot of trouble, she can't always run or look after her (daughter) and needs an helping hand. I used to be a security officer with a 9 years of service, once my wife got granted a disability support pension four years ago, I have decided to step down from service and become a full time carer. I didn't take that role because of being tired of serving my community nor for the money we receive but instead love.
  • KATHY KYRKOU

    VIC
    I am the sister of an Amazing CARER! My sister Maria is the mother and full time carer of her beautiful daughter (and my niece) Andriana, who was born with Down Syndrome. Andriana is a gift to our family and my sister's love and total dedication to my niece's needs defines her as a SUPER HERO! My sister attends to all my niece's needs, be they medical, educational or social and she commits passionately to every undertaking, with humour, patience and love. Such carers often go unnoticed yet they deserve every recognition and accolade in the advocacy of their children's quality of life!
  • chris

    NSW
    When its your child your caring for, love knows no boundaries. Challenges are faced together, heartbreaks are felt together and triumphs are celebrated together. Caring isnt about the blood we share, or a responsibility, we do it because we love them, we want whats best for them, and for them to see the value in themselves that we see in them. Everyone deserves self-worth.
  • Kerry McPaul

    NSW
    I cared for two elderly Men who both suffered from chronic illness (Father and Uncle) for any years as an unpaid carer because I loved them both dearly. My family appeared a only on the odd occasion up until a few months before my fathers death as they did not live locally. I was living on my fathers property and caring for him. He passed away in February and disinherited me. I lost my Dad, my home and my family! I am seriously damaged by this happening to me, my children have been effected, my life will never be the same. I would not wish this devastating experience on anyone.
  • Pep Graham

    NSW
    I am a fulltime carer to my grandmother who is battling the harsh reality of Alzheimer’s. I have lived with her for just over 3 years now and started when I was 20 years old. My nana jean has been our families heroine, rock and strength over the last generation and I hope to give her just as much time, energy and love as she Herself has put into the world.
  • Irene

    NT
    “I cared for my father whom passed away 9 years ago and now i care for my mother who is dependent on me. I do everything for them and I do it because I love them with all my heart. I never want my parents falling into the system. It’s not easy mentally or physically but they need me. Each day spent with them are a gift not a burden. ” I do it because i feel i owe it to them as they cared for me whilst growing up, its just repecting them and yourself, which i find a lack of it these days in our modern world.
  • Eliza Kennedy

    VIC
    I often look at my 73 year old, 5 ft, 48 kg mother who began changing nappies just over 50 years ago and due to my youngest brothers severe physical and intellectual disabilities, is still changing “countenance aids” today! Thousands of aging parents are caring for adult children worried sick about their future without them. God Bless my beautiful Mum and all those unpaid cater!
  • Wendy Zohar

    QLD
    I was married 42 yrs & you don't stop loving someone just because they get sick. My husband had Progressive Supranuclear Palsy & became less & less mobile needing considerable care. I persevered as long as I could until it became too hard physically & emotionally & he had to go into full time care. They were chronically shortstaffed & he didn't get the level of care needed. I would spend as much time as possible with him. Homes are OK if you are mobile & can communicate - he couldn't at the end & was often neglected. He died 3 years ago & I still miss him every day. Nobody cares like family.
  • Christie

    SA
    I have cared for my mum since I was 16, it's been such a rewarding hard experience. I care for her because she struggles to care for herself. She once cared for me so now I'm happy to return the favor to such an amazing Mum. Even my own kids enjoying helping care for her.
  • Therese Murphy

    VIC
    My husband has frontotemporal dementia and I had to give up work to care for him full time. He alsohad a number of physical health issues. There is no one supporting me with his care. Waiting time for his packages to come hae been horrendous aand has a taken a toll on my health. I CARE!
  • Vicky

    VIC
    Thank you carers Victoria for support. My husband and I care for our son who lives with cerebral palsy. He is 34 years old. I also care for my 93 year old father. When life gets tough carers Victoria have helped me via counseling services and courses to make sense of a somewhat complex life.
  • Kim

    VIC
    I care for my elderly parents who are totally dependent on me. I do everything for them and I do it because I love them with all my heart. I don’t want my parents falling into the system. It’s not easy mentally or physically but they need me. Each day spent with them are a gift not a burden.
  • Susan Stringfellow

    QLD
    We have been part-time carers ourselves for 15 years of an elderly aunt who died last year aged 99. My sister was a full time career for her husband for two years until he died last year. Friends have been unpaid full time caterers for years. Anyone who is a career deserves our support and admiration.
  • maria

    VIC
    I care for my husband whom has younger onset Alzheimer's. I cared for him at home for 6 years, until recently when he went into full time care. I still see myself as a carer, as I go throughout the week to pick him up and take him home so he can be with the family. I still oversee all aspects of his care and deal with all issues surrounding health and wellbeing. everything I do at home revolves around my husband, to how I place the furniture and what I prepare for lunch. All my spare time revolves around seeing him and spending time together.
  • Philippa

    SA
    You never stop caring for someone you love, whether or not you're the primary physical carer. When someone can't speak for themselves, defend themselves or stand up for themselves, they are completely and totally vulnerable. No matter how much 'help' you get, your the one who will protect them unconditionally in all aspects of life. It is challenging; physically, mentally and emotionally. A roller coaster ride of joy, sorrow, guilt, hope, anger, compassion, frustration, fear, depression and elation, just to name a few. But you never stop loving and you never stop caring. They only have you.
  • Christine Ottens

    VIC
    I care because I love my family and there is no other choice. I have been a carer for over 7 years now. During that time I cared for my Mum for 6 months while she battled cancer until her passing. I cared for my Dad for 3 1/2 years during his battle with cancer until he passed 2 months ago. And the whole time there's my youngest son who suffered a severe head injury at our library that caused Post Concussion Syndrome, a veinous malformation was found in his brain, brain damage from radiation, etc. Debt, stress and medical conditions keep piling up on me as do the roles I have to fulfil
  • Anne & Parker Maloney

    VIC
    No one will care for our son Dan like we, his mum & dad, & family do. He is our son & no matter what - we love him unconditionally!! Carer organisations employ staff who form a relationship with both Dan & us - but they are transient in his/our lives - it’s what they do for paid work & they often don’t go above & beyond as we do - for the sake of our son! We are the ‘constant’ in Dan’s life. We try to think ‘creatively’ for Dan - to give him the opportunity to experience as much oflife & socialisation skills - to make him as much as an independent, loved & valued human being as possible.
  • Glen Causon

    VIC
    I care with my wife for our 3 sons with one who is dying of cancer I m no different to anyone else who is a carer it takes alot of energy but at the end of the day there is no one better than yourself to take care of the ones you love outsiders only have small knowledge as a primary carer you see the highs and lows to see the good come them it gives you the fulfillment you are as important to them as they are to you, this what makes caring worthwhile as we only want to see the best outcome.
  • Pat

    NSW
    When unexpectedly thrust into the role of caring for a loved one it can be a very scary, confusing, stressful time. When you suddenly have to be thinking for 2, making all the decisions, taking on all the household tasks, all the driving, arranging and getting to medical appointments often on a daily basis and you don't have a family/friends network to help it can be totally exhausting if you are not a well person yourself. Support networks may be there but you have to have the energy and time to find the right one. Unfortunately there is not enough space here to tell my story. C'est la vie!
  • Mary-Lee Ingleton

    WA
    mum has dementia
  • Kay

    QLD
    I am a single parent to my 17 year old son who has numerous disabilities. The most prominent and heart wrenching is PTSD. He also has ASD Aspergers, several types of anxieties, depression. I care because no one knows my son like I do, I sit beside him at night and hope tomorrow will be a better day. I care because there’s hardly any services to help, the NDIS is coming so everything needs to close down leaving us with nothing, not that there was anything. Thank god for my mum, without her I wouldn’t have a roof over my head and some warmth in my heart. Caring isn’t a job, it’s love.
  • Wendy smith

    VIC
    It’s not like you really have a choice. I gave up work to care for my husband who has an acquired brain injury since December 2012. I loved my work but it wasn’t full time so financially and to just manage the whole new world of disability that we were thrust into, it made sense to leave and care for my husband full time.
  • Cecelia Wright

    QLD
    I care for my husband who has PTSD, severe Depression and anxiety plus look after my 3 young children and work full time because I love him and HAVE to care for him. After 25 years in the ADF his parents don’t understand how to care for him and the ADF medically discharged him as soon as he was diagnosed. So he has no other support networks around him. As a carer who also works full time we have to keep going because the system is not supportive and it is ONLY us that will keep the people who suffer most alive and thriving in life.
  • Russell Davis

    VIC
    I have been a full time carer for my wife since 2010. My wife had a brain aneurysm in 1999 6 weeks after my youngest son was born. In 2010 she could no longer look after herself and I had to leave work to take care of her. I would do anything for her. That is what love and marriage is. For better or worse. She would have done it for me. It's hard sometimes but it is the best job in the world.
  • Pam

    VIC
    If you don't care , why do you want to live !
  • Beverley grace

    QLD
    49 years ago I was told I was having a baby. I had two sons I wanted a girl. Naomi arrived pink and beautiful. Such a good baby Then at around 3 years they told me she was mentally challenged with autism I promised her I would be there until I was no,longer around And when that times comes. I will be Reincarnate In to,a small dog And I will look after her. She can call the dog mum. Because I love my daughter and that’s why I care because I love my daughter. She is my life. My everything she my daughter. That’s what a mother does I am 71. Years old.
  • Christine S

    SA
    I was carer before there was very much outside help and understand just how many hours and the energy it takes. I CARED FOR MY LATE HUSBAND FOR 6 YEARS WITH NO ACTUAL HELP TILL THE LAST FEW MONTHS THEN IT WAS 4HRS EVERY 2 WEEKS.
  • Robyn Taylor

    WA
    I care because I am a Carer for my husband. He has had Parkinsons/Alzeimers for nearly 5 years. The past 12 months there has been a decline, especially with memory. It is very hard to see your partner's personality change from what he was before, vibrant, always doing things around the home to now basically not all motivated, no confidence and very frustrated at times. I have found great support with Parkinsons Carer's Groups and have a wonderful groupof friends and family. It is a cruel disease where at this stage there is no cure. Parkinsons WA have a wonderful group of Nurses.
  • Joan Ward

    VIC
    I care for my partner because he has after effects of the Vietnam war. It is not always easy, but because I deeply care for him, I had never had anything to with the armed services in my previous life, so therefore have learnt along the way.
  • Jocelyn Warnock

    WA
    I care for my husband who has Autism, and other Psychological and Physical challenges. I care for him because I know that there's a beautiful person in there that I can't help falling in love with everytime I see him. It hurts me to see him suffering in any way and I want to do anything I can to give him a good day. Unpaid caring is mostly a thankless job seen by others as our responsible duty to our loved ones, which in a way it is,but we quietly sacrifice ourselves for our special people and often miss out. Home maintenance, the business side of running a family, and our own needs miss out.
  • Tania G

    VIC
    I've been caring for my partner since 2009. I do so to prevent him having to reside in a nursing home. It's a thankless task but I feel oblidged to do it. Only those who've been a carer themselves, or who work closely with carers, understand the toll it takes on the carers wellbeing..
  • Amelia

    SA
    I am a young carer I have been for over 2 years i do things like dress dry and house hold work for my mother I also assist with things like paying bills going to meetings and help out with paper work for my mum I care because with out caring people in this would we wouldn't have love ❤️
  • Linda MacKenzie

    QLD
    I have an Autistic son and a ADHD son who I care for . They are a challenge but they also often make me see the world in a whole new light . People NEED to understand these kids don't get " cured " , and they and their families need support ,NOT judgement , every minute of their lives .
  • Aimee

    VIC
    Myself and my husband care for our beautiful little girl who has Autism and an intellectual disability. She’s everything to us and her sister. She has been our greatest teacher.
  • Emma Brady

    NSW
    I am 15yrs old and care for my 17yr old brother with a rare (1 in a million) syndrome, Lowe Syndrome. I have lived my whole life as a carer and helping my mother while my father is at work. Our family doesn't have the flexibility to do other things like other families do and I learnt to accept that. I love him despite any of his (dis)abilities and I'm sure he loves me too. I love to look after him and the looks that my family receive out in public don't worry me anymore because I know they don't understand him like I do.
  • Diane

    VIC
    I look after my two beautiful grandchildren,and I do it because I love them both more then life. If I hadn’t stepped forward and looked after them they would have been put into foster care, they have both turned into fantastic little humans and I’m very proud of them.
  • Kay Booth

    NSW
    I cared for my mother for the last 3 years of her life. It was really hard & we irritated each other sometimes & fought however I am so glad that my partner & I were there for her My brother & sister wanted her to go into a home. She begged me not to let them. I couldn’t go against her wishes She was diagnosed with kidney cancer which then went to her bladder. The dr only gave her 6 months. Two & a half years later she was still fighting til her last breath I still miss her so much & it’s been 3yrs. I will always miss her
  • Glenda Hymers

    VIC
    Like most carers it was foisted upon me. 1st up our Daughter was diagnosed with M.S. must be 22+ years back, she was okay for a few years, they had 2 children, then 16 years back, my Husband, basically blew, up his heart. So that made life interesting for a while. He has had a few good years, but over time both of them have needed more and more assistance. I am full carer for my husband, my son-in-law looks after our daughter, as well as working full time. She is in a wheelchair full time, and manages most things. My Husband has in the last 4months benn diagnosed with Parkinsons disease. With
  • Ann

    QLD
    My husband is now Palliative and I am his 24/7 carer. We married 50 years ago last month. Why do I care? Because I love him. No going to Carer Week celebration for me I know of none! Apart from that who would look after him while I am away?
  • Penny Spiteri

    VIC
    My name is Penny and my husband Charlie and l care for our son Marcus, who's 21 yrs old. He has an intellectual disability, Down Syndrome, Autism and OCD. He's non verbal with a few behavioural issues. He keeps us on our toes and gives us so much love, kisses and hugs. He makes us laugh and is so lovable. Loves getting his photo taken and dancing. He's a joy but can be very tiring as he craves lots of attention. He is a happy go lucky young man and loves going out to meet people.
  • Tammy Sherriff

    TAS
    I have been caring for my 17 year old daughter who has Chronic Anorexia Nervosa for 5 years now.  She struggles every day to eat, get out of bed, go to school, and just fit in. She experiences anxiety, panic attacks and also suffers from depression.  What I have found through personal experience, is that there is no speciality help in Tasmania for eating disorders.
  • Jennifer Leat

    VIC
    I care for my mum as she was a nurse for 45years. Before all her medical issues started she was working in Aged Care so I couldn’t do put into a place she was in charge of. She may not be physically able to do much but she’s still got it upstairs (sometimes). I worked in Aged care before having a child so I have the skill set to do what I do. Why wouldn’t I care for my best friend.
  • ENID O'CONNOR

    VIC
    My husband had a mid brain stem trauma 42 years ago. (14th Aug 1976) He was suppose to die or be a vegetable. He was a very fit young man at the time (A Grade amateur runner/ footballer) This incident left him left sided effected, very determined and very lucky to be the way he is. I have been the constant carer for him over this time. I love my husband ,caring for him was not a choose, it is part of our being. "The years have gone quick, its just that some of the days have been long" The future will see my husband deteriorate, not sure what that will mean to my caring?!
  • Shelly Daniels

    WA
    Without my mum caring for me (unpaid) I wouldn't be able to live on my own. My mum is my rock, she also cared for my late stepdad for over 10 yrs he passed away almost 6 yrs ago. When I am unable to advocate for myself my mum steps up every time. I was a carer in a nursing home for 12 yrs prior to my condition and I know how hard it is. I would just like to thank all the carers out there for those of us who need you I would like to say a heart felt THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR CARING.
  • Patricia Glenane

    VIC
    I am a parent caring for 27 year old with intellectual disability. I care because i love my daughter and it is my responsibility.
  • Amanda

    TAS
    My sons and I look after my father after recent decline in his health . Although at times it’s not easy, due to being his case manager and advocate as well , we wouldn’t have it any other way . Caring is exhausting but rewarding in many aspects . I know he is grateful but I always look forward to respite when my brothers take him for a couple of hours . I don’t receive a payment for this and carers save government millions of dollars . This is a serious glitch and needs to be addressed.
  • Kau Por Chris Hui

    VIC
    It's depending to the person of concern like his or her circumstance, but for me, I am assisting Australian Govt to serve my Mum better, which effectively utilizes all the Govt's available services for Australian Elderlies. Why I care, My Mum is all I have, who gave me her intelligence, including all the necessary supports from a typical parent, and that can help me stepwise in looking for employment. Every job is a merit in itself, and should be taken care of with immensity. I am treating my Mum, of course with extra care, because if my Mum survives, I've got a family after all.
  • Shelly Daniels

    WA
    i am a 44 yr old woman who suffers from several chronic medical conditions,I do not have a paid carer anymore as I am told I don't meet the guide lines now. Apart from my normal everyday conditions in May this year I fell over in the toilet and broke my left leg at night. The following morning my mum using a wheelchair managed to get me to the hospital. I was admitted to hospital and my leg was operated on. I stayed in hospital for 2 months,my visited every day,when I came home unable to walk or drive my mum became my carer(unpaid) Without my mum I wouldnt be here.
  • Judy Liljekvist

    VIC
    I cared for my husband for 9 years following his stroke and developing dementia. During this time I and 3 other carers formed a "caring for carers of people with dementia" support group. When your partner develops dementia your social life just dries up and we supply this for our carers. It is only with people who are experiencing the same thing that a carer can openly speak about things their partner has done, and how they (the carers) are suffering. Even after a carer's partner is placed into a facility, the caring still goes on and the carer still needs support.
  • Rhonda Zschech

    VIC
    I have a daughter who is 16 1/2 years old. She has an intellectual disability, severe autism and possibly bipolar disorder. She also has what I call 'extreme challenging behaviours'. She has lived in residential care for nearly three years now. This was not planned but I could no longer safely care for her. When she went into care, I felt like she had died. I will grieve for her forever, but she is still my beautiful girl. I am still very much involved with her care, and I ring and visit her regularly. On occasion, I still need to advocate for her, as she can't do this herself.
  • Yolanta Westbrook

    VIC
    I care for my Autistic adult son and daughter with both mental and physical disabilities so that they can reach their full potential. There is no-one else out there that can provide the 24/7 support that I provide. Without my help, my son would be in jail or in a psychiatric facility and sadly enough my daughter would be dead. With all the effort I put in and with proper support from the NDIS, I expect my daughter to be well enough soon to go back to part-time education and a part-time job in the near future. I am making sure the community is safe from my Autistic son when he has a meltdown.
  • Mariana Cohn

    VIC
    My husband he has Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s we been married for 53 yers we had a loving marriage and we respect each other we has every children’s grandchildren and wehen I need him to care for me and the. Family he was very caring and did what was necessary
  • Elaine Hurst

    VIC
    I care because I have no other option. When my husband suffered a stroke seven years ago I made a pledge I would dedicate my life to him. I had no idea what that meant. I had never heard the word carer. We were living the good life planning a trip when it all stopped in his garden. My very intelligent, self sufficient, independent man. was gone. The qualities I adored in him had gone . We used to talk and talk all day. He would initiate outings and plan for a happy life. Now he is dependent on me . We still enjoy life but the part he played is severely diminished.
  • Bianca Klingner-Walsh

    NT
    I have a 17 month old baby boy with Down Syndrome, and I care first and foremost because I am his mum and thats what I know as my role. I care because I want to provide him with everything he needs to achieve his full potential. I care beacuse love knows no bounds. I care because to care, and be kind is what makes the world a better place. I care because I am my childs advocate. I am a carer and that makes me proud!
  • Helen Barry

    VIC
    Love and compassion. This is a carer. I was so fortunate to have worked for a person who recognised my commitment and was flexible in our working hours. After 18 months I got up the courage to ask him if I could start at 10 am which enabled me to shower and dress my mother and wait until the day centre called. "Why didn't you ask me before" was his reply.
  • Denise Powell

    VIC
    11 years ago my Mum had a stroke in the emergency department of the hospital, the medical team dismissed it being a stroke. She crawled out of the hospital, into the car and crawled back inside. That began my carer journey. No support of any kind was given to me and I did everything on my own. I had no family or friend help. I had to quit my job as her needs over the years got worse. It took a move 5 and a half years ago to finally get help. I tried to get help over the years but was little to no help, no matter what I did.
  • Jodie

    TAS
    I operate a home care business an my employees work in conjunction with carers on a daily basis to assist on keeping their loved ones at home. We see how exhausted loved ones can be as there is not a lot of time where they can have a break. For some of our clients a full nights sleep feels like a distant memory. Even though we deliver in home care, the carers fill in the gaps and if it wasn't for those people dedicating their time to their loved ones, their loved ones would not be able to remain at home. Our appreciation goes out to all carers within our community.
  • Anthea Miles

    VIC
    I care for my 3 autistic children as they are my loves & my life. It is not easy with several debilitating physical & mental health conditions myself, but it is worth it to make sure I can give them the best life I can. Despite all their difficulties they are the most amazing children who bring so much joy to my heart. I fear for what the future holds for them but will always do my best to ensure I can do everything in my power to make sure they have all the opportunities, support & success they deserve in life. I couldn’t imagine my life without them.
  • frances bohan

    VIC
    I care because I can and the people I care about are my family and I theirs. caring can be/is a thankless task, however it is innate in me to care, I have done it all my life for my family.
  • Karen Faulkner

    VIC
    Reason for caring is that when you have a love one in need. You step up and help them in any way you can. Caring is 24/7 it is a full time job, a labour of love. You need to advocate to make sure their needs are meet and the their voice is heard. As well as looking after yourself in often difficult situations.
  • Rosanne Pirrottina

    VIC
    I met my husband while nursing at the hospital where he lived - he had a physical disability & used an Iron Lung to breathe. 2 years later we were married. I stopped working & he moved out of the hospital into our home, along with his Iron Lung. That was 29 years ago. He later received a portable ventilator. For 9 years now he can't be left alone as he has a tracheostomy. Despite the lack of sleep & shortage of trained support, I don't regret my role as his Carer and am proud to be his Wife. He has taught me so much about life, resilience & perseverance, especially with his volunteer work
  • Anne

    VIC
    Because we all need someone on our side. If I don't advocate for them, no-one else will.
  • John & Elaine Lane

    VIC
    Our daughter was born 1965, when we found out she is handicapped. Our aim was to do as much as we were able to do for her. Our Specialist said to take her home and give her as much love and care was possible. We have achieved this as she is now 52 years old A placement has happened for her as we had her in three houses 2nights & 3 days once a month for her to handle a change when it was available. The movement was successful and we are very happy, however we have her home every week-end. This is successful Kind Regards John & Elaine lane
  • Margaret Tonks

    VIC
    Caring for a loved one is very stressful as you have to add the emotional connection. In many cases you are caring for someone and you know it is a one way journey and in many cases your loved one ceases to know who you are. In some diseases like dementia the personality of the cared for one changes and you have to deal with behavioural issues. This can be made even worse if the carer becomes ill them selves, even having to deal with cancer..To help me cope I sought support from a psychologist. This helped me get things into perspective.Joining a group of fellow Carers helped me tremendously.
  • Lucy Salinas

    VIC
    Carera are saving money to the tax payers as the sick person can stay home. Beds will be unavailable for younger taxpayers. Won’ Be enough staff to cover the demand. Sick people recover soon when they are at home with family and friends
  • Sandy

    VIC
    Because the person I’m caring for is my purpose in life . My life is fulfilled and rewarding . I love my life ♥️♥️.
  • Tilara

    VIC
    Because i love my sister and she has a brain injury
  • Beth lucena

    VIC
    I care for mum as she once cared for me as a child wonderfully The knowing feeling that she appreciates me so much I would rather do it than a stranger Dad said always lol after mum It gives me such pleasure doing this too
  • Christine Duffin

    VIC
    Why I care, well he’s my child We chose to have him and decided no matter what was put in front of us we would take the good with the bad, he’s a beautiful 4yr with autism and GDD, he’s personality is special and I care for him, take him to all his appointments because he is my son and I care xx
  • Beverley mc kinnon

    VIC
    My son has intellectual disability plus became Epileptic when his father died.who I cared for 2years previously. I love my son he needs me. I can.t work .Don.t ever leave him on his own. Most of the Carers are great. Financially stretched. Feel very isolated. Hard to coordinate care.?
  • Tracy Sparks

    VIC
    Every day I assist wonderful unpaid carers and I wish we could help them more. These carers are doing amazing work 24hours a day with very little support, in a system that is often difficult to navigate and understand, putting their life on hold so their person receives the care they need. Without these brave carers our communities and health system would not cope with the demand for assistance, we need to do all we can to support our carers so they can continue doing their fabulous work.
  • Christine Stow

    VIC
    I care for my daughter who is 18 and has swartz Jampel syndrome. She is the light of my life. She is love. I love her cheeky smile and hanging out with her. I could not do it without NDIS. However NDIS needs to recognise carers. Statistics say that the great revolution of support from NDIS has not helped carers get back into paid work. It is my quest to find a way to care and use the skills I have to work in a meaningful role. To go back to medical, laboratory and engineering sales. We need NDIA & community attitudes to change to make this happen
  • Helen Johnson

    VIC
    My precious & very loved 24yo son who was born with multiple & complex disabilities requires me to manage his supports 24/7 & provide active Night care each & every night. He is vulnerable & would not survive without my care! Should I give up the care or I am no longer able to care, his active 24/7 care needs would cost the Australian economy in excess of $500K as quoted by a Victorian Disability Case Manager.
  • Peter Bills

    VIC
    Because I loved my wife, now passed away. If I didn't care, she would have been in a hospital for the past 15 years. As it was, she was able to stay home in a familiar, loving place, except for the last year of her life. Surely that's a good thing?
  • Lina Sobol

    VIC
    We as a cares work without pay we have no one to relax and tell us it will be ok . All I hear is one day you’ll be rewarded from God. Meanwhile I become old ,and gray ,depressed ,and so on . The government forgot that we were yong ones we work to achieve a home and know that we are old and frail and need help no one is available
  • Kate

    VIC
    Looking after ppl part of our daily life otherwise their life won’t improve
  • Vanessa Wright

    VIC
    I care because, he is my partner, I love him and there is no one else to do it. I care because, otherwise he would have to go into a care facility where he would loose what independence he has left. I care because, as a child that is what my parents taught me, to care for others less fortunate than ourselves, be it financial, health, spiritually or any other reason. I care because I want to. Yes I feel isolated, forgotten and alone at times but I would never stop doing it because I CARE.
  • Danny

    SA
    Hi, I'm Danny and my partner of 36 years has been part caring his mate of over 40 years who sadly is in the late stages of Motor Neurons Disease and now requires daily home assistance due to mobility and breathing disfunctions. As he only has one sibling here and the other Interstate, it's down to my partner and a small group of friends to assist in the ongoing professional support he receives. Our friend has a house and many outdoor avaries housing exotic birds which need daily maintenance as does his house and garden. This can prove very difficult at times at my partner is employed full time
  • Yvonne Parker

    VIC
    I live by the Golden Rule
  • Kira daisley

    QLD
    I Care for my mother who has schizoaffective disorder as well as physical problems. She needs assistance in almost everything she does. This has been my life for 10 years now, I am the luckiest 25 year old there is, the fact I can devote day in and day out 24 hours a day 7 days a week is a huge help to my family and most importantly my mother. If it weren’t for the governments financial help, I would not be able to be here providing care, the care my mother so desperately needs.
  • AGNES ANGELA YONG

    NSW
    Carers and especially unpaid Carers do not have a Fair Go in Australia. We care and concern for the sick, disabled, blind & deaf, the vulnerable and the frail & aged in our National communities. The Carers especially the unpaid ones have saved billions for state & federal governments & they should recognize and acknowledge them more in the communities. Carers play a very important part in society because caring for the sick, vulnerable and frail & aged in our communities can contribute to faster recoveries, more optimistic and better lives for their future.
  • BENJAMIN CHARLES

    QLD
    HELLO MY NAME IS BEN. I HAVE BEEN A CARER FOR MY PARENTS SINCE MY MOTHER BECAME SICK IN 2016. SHE DIED OF STOMACH AND OVARIAN CANCER IN 2019 WHICH PUT MY FATHER DEEPLY DISTRESSED. MY FATHER IN THE FOLLOWING YEARS HAS HAD 9 STROKES UP TO 2016 WHEN HE WAS PLACED INTO A NURSING HOME BY MY BROTHER AFTER I WAS LOOKING AFTER HIM FOR THE PERIOD. SINCE THEN I HAVE BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH HEART DISEASE, SEVERE DEPRESSION AND ADJUSTMENT SYNDROME BECAUSE OF THE LACK OF SUPPORT FROM THE REST OF THE FAMILY. I CARE BECAUSE HE IS MY FATHER AND HE BOUGHT ME UP THE RIGHT WAY AND I LOVE HIM VERY MUCH.
  • Michelle

    SA
    My three children are autistic, one has Type 1 diabetes. I gave up paid work to homeschool my youngest two due to their anxiety around attending school (the environment and lack of support and understanding). We have no support from family. We are the only ones who understand them.
  • Ian Philp

    QLD
    My wife just turned 55. At start of year she had to resign from work being diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's. Runs in the family We are too young for pension, but ineligible for Centrelink as I earn still. (Not a great wage but we are lucky as we own our house) I am caring to make sure the remaining time she has with me, which may be short, is the best I can make and hopefully make her remaining time as happy as possible Thank you and best wishes to all
  • Kerri-Anne Dooley

    QLD
    I care for my 21yr old son with bipolar. I am also the Care Service Manager of Home Instead Senior Care Brisbane North empowering seniors to live & die in their own homes. Caring makes us better humans. By extending care to others we learn the true meaning of life is to give & not receive. Though I must say in all my years of nursing & caring I have been grateful for what my patients & clients have taught & given me through their selfless example of courage & tenacity in the face of challenge.
  • Sharon James

    NSW
    Because ???????????????????? my mother has dementia .... we rent a place together now .... i feel that if I had been born with a severe disability my mum and dad would have looked after me forever ..... it is now my choice to give back to my mum. Toughest job I have ever done BUT..... I wouldnt have it any other way....
  • Jason Starling

    QLD
    This year my brother came to live with me and I have taken on being his primary carer as he is wheelchair bound and has hand/arm restrictions from a muscular neurological condition. My brother was born with this condition and has endured years of medical probing. We were faced with a decision to place him in a home or live with me. As family comes first, this was a simple decision. Whilst I have been impacted by this decision, and frustrated by the bureaucracy and red tape. I do not have to live my b brothers life and thus the impact for me is not a concern.
  • Patricia Sutton

    SA
    I care for my 2 sons who have severe mental illness and associated psychosocial disabilities - because I have no choice! As with many people with severe mental illness, they are unable to care properly for themselves and they are also unable to advocate for themselves, so it has been my full-time job and my husbands also for the last 27 years to care and support them. Good quality services, especially in the community, are scarce and difficult to access, so it is essential that carers learn all that they can about supports to assist their lived ones and to assist them in their caring role.
  • Gary Blaschke OAM

    NSW
    My story began with an accident that changed my life. Being told that I would never surf again due to my injuries, I instantly became aware exactly what a disability does to your confidence and moral. Whilst laying in hospital, I began to wonder how I could help others experience the thrill of surfing, no matter what their disability. Thirty years later with eighteen voluntary branches around Australia & New Zealand, the Disabled Surfers Association of Australia Inc. is proving that communities care. Even though we have won many Water Safety awards, it is all about putting smiles on dials.
  • Kaye Cotter

    WA
    Because thats what we do
  • Nick

    My reason for 'Caring' is because no one else will do it. l'd also like to point out that the ones we take care of, are very often, not the most appreciative people. We Carers suffer a lot of domestic abuse.
  • Kate

    QLD
    I care for my older sister with high-functioning autism and schizophrenia, I don't have family to help. My parents are elderly and have physical disabilities and mental health issues because of caring for my sister. I've had to sacrifice my entire 20's to look after my sister and to keep her safe and functional. This has cost me many opportunities, finances, my career, my health, relationships and more. I love my sister but caring for her destroyed my life. There's a serious lack of quality and reliable services to care for her in the way she needs. As a result, we're both very sad and unwell.
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Because I can and because its how the world gets better
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Because I care and Family = love and wouldn't have it any other way!!
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Love family because we all need someone To make sure we are happy It makes us feel better
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Because its what you do!
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    I carer because its Family, no one understands their needs or requirements better than I do
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    I care because I am a caring person
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Everyone needs love and it feels good helping someone
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Life is hard and no one should have to go it alone xxxx
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Caring is a responsibiity we should all take on !!
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    That's what you do for your family
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Because I have been brought up that way, its my nature
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Because love heals everything and we become better people
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Because people deserve to be cared for
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Because it feels good knowing you help someone
  • Carer Mount Gambier

    SA
    Making Them Happy, Make sure there OK, Talk to them
  • Nugget

    WA
    To make someone else feel good
  • Sue Mason

    QLD
    I care full time for my 90 yr old Mum. She's as sharp as ever just frail and badly affected by arthritis so needs help for all the things we take for granted.Of all the decisions I have had to make, this was strangely the easiest, given its not easy for a parent and adult child to blend their lives and homes. But she has always said focus on what you can do, not what you can't. We “do” lunch, try and catch movies, see the odd musical and argue politics until the cows come home – that sparks her up! Its tiring, heavily responsible but I love my Mum and we manage. Blue Care is fabulous. Thanks
  • Sandra

    WA
    My life started as a Young Carer for my mother who was born deaf, mute and has interlectual disability. I got married and moved away to a country town Esperance, and in 2007 I had a baby boy and age 2/3 he was diagnosed with Autism. I have 4 children and a husband FIFO. 2 years ago I started working as a Carer consultant and studying Mental Health. Soon to move to Perth as now my son is at the next stage of moving forward to bigger dreams. I was born a Carer and I shall part this world as Carer...
  • Susanna

    NSW
    My daughter is the carer of her two children who have autism. She is a wonderful mum and does her best to do what is needed for them. They are low on the spectrum not toilet trained at 8 and 12 and non verbal. Life is hard to say the least. Not much help from government or family except from us her parents and of course her husband. School holidays are a nightmare. If I could vote for her to be mother of the year I would. She is amazing and caring. I don’t know how she does it. Well done our beautiful girl!
  • Sharon Cook

    VIC
    I care for my mum for the last ten years it not easy when you don't have a lot of support and family to help you or even someone to talk I wish I could take a break for a while and just refresh it been hard for the last week I had a bad back and I have just got to keep going. thank for listen. I wouldn't change anything I love my mum.
  • Billi Edgar

    NSW
    I care for my mother who is both mentally and physically disabled. Since I was young I have watched her struggle with her disabilities and have always tried to help her. When I was about 16 she started needing more help around the house, to manage her medicatuon and to get to doctors appointments. From then on I have slowly picked up more duties. My mum has a broken back in several places, a head injury from domestic violence, PTSD and whole plethora of other problems. I find helping her one of the most fulfilling things I have ever done.
  • Belinda Murnane

    QLD
    I care because I have a 35 yr old son who got a brain injury from birth he has an intellectual disability and autistic tendencies he loves sports and is in two tenpin bowling leagues ,I as his mother runs those two leagues plus a third one because I care about my community and the disabled persons in it...have been doing this for over ten years love nothing more than helping these girls and guys learn social skills and achieve their bowling goals....
  • Leila

    NSW
    I am a carer for my disabled son. I describe him as my 8y/o baby. He still needs everything done for him. It takes a village to raise a child and even more so when they are disabled. We are enjoying growing his vilage.
  • Karen

    QLD
    I care full time for my son his autistic and has interlectual disability he is my whole world and my world would not be the same without him. Special kids make special family's have learned so much from him his non verbal
  • Kyle Gordon

    VIC
    I have a close friend who is a carer and she dedicates herself to making sure her client is well looked after and happy and I am so proud of her she is my inspiration
  • Cheryl Halliday

    NT
    I grew up as a young carer, caring for my mother and brother who both have schizophrenia, I am now an adult and still care for them both, they often relapse due to the lack of support from mental health services, the community, family and friends so I am there to make sure they receive help and support during their difficult times, and I get to see when they are well.
  • Brian Webber

    VIC
    I care for my Mother in Law because she has done so much for our family over the years, she is now frail and living with my Wife Cheryl and I. Cheryl has two siblings who take very little interest in the welfare of their Mum, and it is unfair for Cheryl to bear the full weight of looking after her Mum. Naturally, being a male I mostly let my wife attend to her mum’s intimate needs, and I support with cooking all the meals, maintaining her Mother’s house and shopping and of course looking after her when Cheryl needs a break, and act as a buffer when it all becomes “too much”.
  • Ange

    NSW
    I am writing this for the wonderful lady who is caring for both my parents, because of her, my parents are in the best hands ever. I care because I believe one day I too will need to be cared for, we all do. This industry is as vital and equivalent to all medical facilities. Happy Carers Week to all!
  • Lorraine Rea

    WA
    My son was diagnosed with Schizophrenia in his early 20s. I was told by a doctor to grieve for the son I had lost and get to love the new one. I thought that was rubbish but in fact it is so true. Your son changes from the person you have known to this other person you do not know but over the years (he is now 42) I have learned to love this new one and get to know him and love him just the same. He is now in 24 hour care but I visit him every week and he rings me every night. You do not stop caring because they change due to illness, they are still your children.
  • Alexandra Taylor

    NSW
    My husband and I have been married for 3 years in November. He was born with kidney issues and has had 2 kidney transplants, the second one is currently failing and he has been on dialysis for 12 months now. We did about 3 months of training and we now do dialysis at home which makes things a lot easier. Life is hard sometimes but, he is definitely worth the fight ❤️
  • Megan Hayman

    NSW
    My son Corey was born with a rare life threatening condition called panhypopituitarism he also has low functioning autism, inattentive Adhd and severe anxiety which is very hard for him so learning how to get through his anxiety meltdown is definitely a learning curve but. So we care for the love we have for our son and to see him laugh and smile everyday ????????????.
  • Leanne folbigg

    QLD
    Hi grow up in NSW an at the age of 17 careered for my grandfather after multiple stokes now a full time career to my 26 year old daughter with cp an other medical problems
  • Rob and Kirsten

    QLD
    I care because the institution where I was a nurse closed down 31 years ago (I was 26), and left 21 children who had special needs to be dispersed around the country, far from those they had spent their entire lives with. I couldn't accept this and took three of the boys (all have Down Syndrome) to live with me - Tim (13, now 44) Matthew (10, passed away in my arms at age 30) and Jason (10, now 40). 7 Years later I married the most amazing man and we had 2 more children. We continue to care for Tim and Jason at home with us because it is the most natural thing to us - we love them completely.
  • Kay Smith

    QLD
    I care for my brain injured husband and my disabled son. Why do I care? Well because these are my people who belong with me and they need the help, it is that simple. Why have I been put in the position of unpaid caring? With my husband it is because he falls through the cracks in the system. He is well enough to work full time, but he isn't able to manage his day to day affairs, so I take 100% responsibility for domestic work (including traditional men's roles) &for all our finances and managing what used to be a joint business. I also manage his health, appointments & raising our 3 children.
  • Jo

    QLD
    I am a divorced mum of three special needs children. My 20 year old twin daughter and son and 16 year old son. My daughter suffers from ADHD, Agoraphobia and severe anxiety. Her twin brother suffers from Autism, Depression and Severe anxiety. My 16 year old son suffers from Autism, ADHD, Depression, Severe anxiety and Agoraphobia. As they rarely leave the house, only for doctor's appointments etc, I am their full time carer. I also suffer from Major Depression and Anxiety. I am all they have and they are my life. I am their mother and my love and caring is never ending.
  • Bernadette

    NSW
    I grew up seeing my parents as healthy, independant couple who constantly cared and helped family and friends. Now my dad is 91 and my mother 84 unfortunately have health issues, yes they are the ones who need care and help. My brother who is intellectually disabled also lives with them. How can I not care and be there for them they are my family. I am fortunate i work four days a week. This allows me to scedule their specialist appointments, shopping and other things that need doing on the day off. I have also been blessed with a very supportive partner.
  • Ev Foley

    NSW
    My mother has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's. She has been under the care of an adult sibling who lives with her. Unfortunately, that close proximity and the slow decline of Alzheimer's means the carer has ended up in a crisis, under-prepared, leading to chronic neglect and abuse. Family tension and denial, prevented outside 'help' deemed as interference so living conditions, health, mental health all declined. Her condition exacerbated unnecessarily. Stigma needs to be dramatically reversed. Everyone suffers. Eduation and support for adult unmarried male carers of aging mothers is needed.
  • Mary

    ACT
    I care because nothing matters more than the health and wellbeing of those I love best. I give a big shout out to all of those carers who combine work and care. There are days that I think I can't do it after long nights of broken sleep, back pain and heartbreak but I front up to the office and always try to do my best. My co-workers understand. My hope, this National Carers Week, is that every carer who balances work and care is able to walk into a workplace that is as supportive as mine.
  • Christina Bryson

    QLD
    I care for my mum, she was struck down with sepsis almost two years ago and spen 7 weeks in hospital, we almost lost her twice. I care for her along with my father, I give her her medication and my dad helps her dress because she can’t lift her arms above her head, I also do the cooking and the shopping
  • Connie Florence

    QLD
    Carers are angels - and we need all the angels we can get. To lovingly participate in the downhill journey of a partner/friend/relative who has dementia is daunting. When carers connect with others in similar situations, the load seems lighter. Education re the many aspects of dementia and it's effect on the family, the person, the community helps everyone understand. We need to help carers enjoy each day. Tomorrow will come soon enough. Love Connie
  • Helen C

    NSW
    People say, "oh you are so good looking after your granddaughter." I say what would you do otherwise, what if you are in my shoes, you would do the same? She is nearly nine now and has been with us for 5 years and growing beautifully. She is full of life and is a caring person. It was hard at first our son and his partner had her, but then things started to fall apart. They were not looking after her medical needs and the lies and excuses began. My husband passed away last December at the age of 74 from the effects of chemotherapy. All he wanted to do was see her grow up. We have good support.
  • Dianne M

    QLD
    I began caring when my partner was diagnosed with Bi-Polar and, as I vowed to stay in the marriage, I stayed. Once my choice was made it was easy to research medications and outcomes. Hard to find specialists. Our lives became more intertwined and although things haven't always run smoothly we have always been in it together. Over the years I have also cared for our sons. One has Aspergers and one developed Bi-Polar. Life with them is always lived on the edge. Finding help and understanding is not easy. Caring has taught me patience and that love isn't enough.
  • Kim

    NT
    I have been Caring for mum who has several strokes, the last one was devastating. I care because my mum is an amazing tough resilient woman. She is everything to us as family.
  • Raylene Ann Stephanos

    QLD
    I care full time for my husband,who as cerable plausey, combined with nureological disorders as well as epilepsy,which he went had a turn in 33 yrs.Cluster headaches syndrome , Narrowing of the spinal cord which is progressing at rapid rate . I love my husband will and have promised to stand by him. Caring for someone is a commitment,& for some people it is a calling on a persons life. I know it as been for me.Being a carer for me it is journey , we all have a story to share of our own experiences in in life.
  • Tracey Byron

    QLD
    I care for my eldery parents and I have no support from any my step brother's. Aged care are useless and in qld you get nothing from carers . I haven't had a hoilday ever and my honey moon well what's that. No one know whats it like in real life. People just fake it as there is so much pian and hurt. I know since being a carer i have lost my relationship with my parents as daughter i am know just a slave. People need to see the real side not just fake media crap.
  • Elle Gillard

    VIC
    People ask me how do I get by caring for so many, and I say it’s easy because they are my family and I want to make sure they have the best care and supports in place, and this is not without its challenges I can tell you. I have been a carer and parent to my now 23year old son with duel disabilities, including Autism. 4 years ago I became a carer to my husband who was injured in a work accident which is currently ongoing. And 12 months ago I also became a carer for my mum after her diagnoses on early dementia and her second stroke.
  • Pauline Simmons

    NSW
    My husband was coward punched in 1997 by a work colleague while serving in the RAN. We had been together for 18months when this happened. I was 21 yrs old. As a result, he suffered an ABI (frontal lobe, pituitary gland damage) and sufferes from PTSD. I am still here after 20 yrs plodding along. Although I did have a mental breakdown in April of this year, which required hospitalization. Struggling with isolation, my own depression, finances, no real support and raising 3 children in the midst. Fortunately, now I have an amazing counsellor. I fell in love with him before it happened. He's my ro
  • Robyn Doyle

    QLD
    My parents 'brought me up' to care. I care for my 89 year old mother who has multiple comorbidities and my 23 year old daughter who has a terminal illness - Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Eisenmengers Syndrome, Kartagener Syndrome, Congenital Heart Disorder and numerous other MEDICAL Conditions. We received no help from Disability Services Queensland because they never give any assistance to people with Medical conditions. My daughter cannot work or study. We have had to buy her wheelchairs, hospital bed, oxygen etc. etc. unlikely to receive help from the NDIA.
  • Tracy Hansen

    QLD
    I have been a carer most of my 57 years, first with my younger brothers and sisters, then with my husband, and my daughters, and now with grandchildren. My husband Bruce had myotonic muscular dystrophy which gradually weakened him and took him from me last year. I hurt myself a few times whilst looking after him, and still bear the scars physically and mentally. Praise God for caring companies that helped me during the last 5 years, but now he is gone, I am left with soreness that will not leave me, in my back and legs.
  • Jackie van Benthem

    QLD
    LOVE!!! Love endures long and is kind....... 49 years ........with my dear Ton. Jackie van Benthem
  • Masline

    QLD
    The reason I care for my family member who has chronic schizophrenia is that if I didn't my family member would not have survived mental illness. Yet the truth is that caring has a financial cost to the carer in terms of lost superannuation and savings. Rather than platitudes about the benefits carers make to society (actually this is not our aim but has been co-opted as an add-on value) what carers really need is a proper replacement income (rather than the subsistence level Carer Payment) and substitute superannuation payments, because ultimately there is no such thing as "unpaid" care.
  • Hayley

    QLD
    I am a carer to my 3 young teens , with ASD, Anxiety & Diabetes type 1. I care as I’m a nurturing parent who never gives up. I will advocate for my teens & inspire them to reach for sky.
  • kane fenech

    QLD
    hello my name is Kane im 17 and a young carer the reason why I care, is my 26 year old brother who has cerebal palsy quadripliegic and has an acquired brain injury which means his legs don't have the same ability as a everyday person would which means that he has to walk with a wheelie walker and has a wheelchair for when he goes out of the house, he requires day to day nurses to shower and look after him. since the age of five I have sacrificed my life style to help take the stress and take the load off my mom. my day to day getting him ready, go to school and come home and care for him
  • Milinda Krogh

    QLD
    I have been caring for my 35 year old son for over 17 years who has Mental Health issues. I have advocated on his behalf with Centrelink, GPS, Psychologists, Psychiatrists, community services and other family members. I have had to tolerate and be patient with some of the aforementioned regarding negativity, unrealistic demands and lack of understanding of Mental Illness. I very happy to say throughout my caring,understanding and support I managed to assist my son from not going into the hospital system. He has become a high functioning citizen in society and is able to advocate for himself
  • Jennifer Woodforde

    QLD
    I’ve been a carer since childhood for several members of my family at different times and each had different needs. When I became a parent the caring role for family continued and it seemed to be interwoven with my role as a parent. I was never acknowledged as a carer and didn’t think of myself as a carer. I simply cared because I loved them.
  • Daryl Clarke

    QLD
    My wife was diagnosed with Alzheimers Disease nearly 10 years ago, and I managed to care for her at home for the first 5 years, at which time she entered an Residential Aged Care facility. I encountered many disturbing issues with the facility and it's management, many of which have recently been publicised by TV documentaries. In September 2017 I realised the only safe option for her ongoing care was to remove her from the facility and care for her on a 24/7 basis. The dedication required was not at all difficult, compared to the isolation that comes with the work.
  • Jasmine

    QLD
    I have a 52 year old son with Bipolar 2 also a Diabetic he has no feeling in the bottom of his feet and tips of his fingers
  • Tracey Ryan

    QLD
    Since 2013 I have been my beloved Mum's full-tume live-in carer, following a major cardiac event she went through. Her GP told me that I had to arrange for her to have live-in care. She has always been there for me... so it was a no-brainer for me. I quit my $60k a year job, packed my house and moved 1500km to look after her. Why? Because I love her to the sun and back.. I need her as much as she needs me.. we're there for each other and I wouldnt have a it any other way!!!
  • Rachael Puguma

    QLD
    Hi,am a full time mum of 17 months old daughter who she diagnosed with down syndrome from birth, she had heart defect which was done her right AVSD and left yet to be seen the cardiac Doctor some time soon.Most of the times I end up in ICU in Mater Mother's Hospital when she got chest infection and cold and flu too,anyways there the times are not perfect but I humblely love my daughter much more then ever as with the help of my loving partner.
  • Rachel Hallas

    QLD
    I care for both my aging parents and as mentioned by so many others I care because I care... because living life well is about finding ways to be part of the solution and not part of the problem.
  • Elizabeth Rose

    NSW
    I am a carer for my beloved partner Tim. Following an aneurysm in 1999, his sight started to deteriorate. We were not together at this time. We met in 2005 and since then we fell in love and have been living together since 2014. I love Tim unconditionally. When we met he was already going blind. So although I didn't know how hard it was going to get, I knew that he was the one for me. I don't want to be anywhere else. He is my world and I am his. He has just been given a long stick with a ball and we are about to have some lessons so that he can be a little more independent.
  • Nicole

    QLD
    My 11 year old daughter has adhd and I also work in the industry as I wanted to help others with a disability and see them achieve there goals no matter how big or small they are . It is rewarding to see them achieve these and to see the smile on there face says it all
  • Lynette

    QLD
    My husband has mental health illness, the 24/7 care demands rarely ease. While he would love to be off all meds and 'be free' it is going on and on. I love my husband and will always be there for him. Am I asking too much for our community to take time to recognize what I and thousands of other carers do, that we are able to say - I am a carer - and not be looked upon as "poor you", you don't really have a 'real' job.
  • Jennifer Leat

    VIC
    My mother has been a nurse for 45years until she had to retire because of her health. Her last 20 years of working was in Aged care. To put her into where, she was in charge to be treated as a patient would drive her nuts and she’s probably a good 10-20 years younger than the other residents. I care for my mum because she’s my best friend, has been my care giver as a child, we have all lived together for the last 15 years anyway and she is my only parent for the last 23years. I worked in Aged care as a PCA so I have the skill set to do what I have to do. Why let others do what I can do better.
  • Sonia Sporton

    VIC
    I’m a full time carer for my elderly Mum who has both types of arthritis, as well as ASD2 & needs 2 knee replacements- as well as my 5 yr old daughter with ASD. No one knows my girls better than me. No one could ever go to such detail and depth for caring for them the way they want it - like me - coz they are a part of me. I want to always be here for them. Helping them enjoy every part of their day.
  • Cathy Harding

    QLD
    At the age of four my son was diagnosed with autism and a year or so later his little sister also. This was the start of my caring journey above and beyond that of a mother. I attended workshops, therapies, early intervention, and read extensively, and learned to be an advocate. But the journey was far more than that. I stepped into a world that I barely knew existed before, heard stories from other carers that tore at my heart, and saw the strength in people that devote their life to caring. Caring for me now means encouraging change and to educate whenever I have the opportunity.
  • Bill Peacock

    QLD
    My Carer 24/7 is one of so many unpaid carers who dedicate their lives to unselfishly give and give to family and friends. No one could ever sacrifice so much to provide life to a person with a disability that does not begin at 9 and end at 5 but continues around the clock.
  • Jo-anne

    WA
    LOVE My partner had a sudden onset of crippling pain in 2015, since then they have needed significate assistance
  • Brooke

    QLD
    I am a Mum of 5 beautiful children who I love dearly, they are my world. My eldest (15) and youngest (6) daughter need a bit of extra care as my eldest daughter has Bipolar disorder and severe PTSD and my youngest has ASD. Some days are very difficult and I often wish I had an extra set of eyes, ears and hands or even had 5 minutes of alone time lol. I get through the hard times with the love and support of my amazing hubby and family. No matter how difficult and exhausting some days can be, my kids still make me smile and laugh so much. I care because I love them to bits!!!
  • Kylie Searle

    NSW
    I moved into my dad's house so I can take care of him. He was recently diagnosed with terminal lung cancer, it hit us pretty hard. At the moment I'm also caring for my son who just had a knee reconstruction surgery. I'm a single mum of two wonderful boy's who have been amazing with helping me with their pop. Some day's it's not easy physically and mentally but I get through it. My dad say's I'm an angel but i don't think so, I'm just his daughter doing what any daughter should be doing. Dad's looked after me all my life, now it's my turn to take care of him, i wouldn't have it any other way.
  • Noel Dunstan

    QLD
    I have been caring for my wife for twenty years and my son for over forty years.My wife has been in a nursing home for the last ten years -as she is high care -completely immobile and has to be hoisted everywhere-to bed and bathroom etc.My son has mild cerebral palsy,lives in a residential and comes home two days a week and is very happy with his life. On the other hand my wife - understandably is not quite so happy, she is completely dependant on some else to help her with every little chore.We have a minibus with a wheelchair lifter,and take her out regularly.I still love my caring role.
  • Laura Lewis

    QLD
    I care because I parent. My caring doesn’t stop with the love and meeting of physical and emotional needs. I advocate and lobby. I read and research. I actively work at bringing about positive change for not just my child but everyone. This means networking, writing letters, tweeting and calling out bad practices whenever I see them. It’s both exhausting, necessary and meaningful. Inclusion is very important and everyone wins when it works.
  • Rita Harden

    NSW
    I am a mother, but so much more. I am a woman, a sister, a daughter, and a friend. I am a student, a worker, and also a full time Carer. I care because he is my son, and so are my other two boys. I care because he needs me. I care because I know what's best for him. I care because I want to see him succeed. I care because no one else will look after him. I care because I am his only family in Australia. I care, because I love him. I care for him because he has Down syndrome. I couldn't care for him so well, if I don't have the support from those around me.
  • Leonie. Greenbury

    VIC
    I care for my brother Jeff whom has a diagnosis of schizophrenia & alcoholism . I took my brother in to live with me after he ended up in hospital after having a seizure at a bus stop near his shared accomodation . He was starving and needed help a secure place to live and someone to get him on the road to recovery . I did short courses through Alfred health to learn quickly about my brothers condition & how best to help him . I linked him in with FAmdas for drug & alcohol treatment . Then we got his teeth all fixed up . Then the podiatrist & diabetics clinic. I wanted to help him in life .
  • Barb Richardson

    VIC
    I have been caring for my Special needs daughter for just on 48 years, the last 20 years on my own after her Dad passed away! I continue to care as I’ve always considered her a gift! She accepts whatever life throws at her smiling all the time! She is my inspiration, my love, my life my all. I will always be her Carer.
  • peter peck

    VIC
    my wife is very unwell with alot off health issues and she just spent a couple off days in hospital recently just to get the sad news she has lung cancer so we just trying to get our head around that at the moment she is such a loveing caring person that would go out off her way to help anyone and she has been through alot in her life always has a smile on her face never complains i have been a full time carer for her nearly 14 years and couldnt think of a better way to show my gratitude love and admiration and respect i have for her she means the world to me
  • Fred hagerstrom

    SA
    My wife has many diabilitys pin in right foot , charcois foot , spina bifida aculta , crushed shoulders from a bus accident , nuropothy , I gave up 40 week plus overtime to be her full time carer , I would like to return to full time work but I don't see this happening as she needs my help 24 , 7 , and we are in the process of applying for ndis , thanx fred
  • Dianna Hickey

    NSW
    I care because I’m a Mum, because she’s my daughter, because family is everything, because she is precious, because she needs me, because I want to, because I love her. It’s that simple but it’s not always easy, it’s a challenge and I try to remain positive and happy. I want her to have a happy life and to be safe. It is a worry thinking about the future, about when I can no longer care for her. It breaks my heart. I love her, she’s my daughter, Kate.
  • Tania Giorgio

    ACT
    I care because we are so close, I care because if I don't no one else will, I care because she is the sweetest, funniest most cheekiest sister in law. I agreed to be her legal guardian and as her legal guardian my role is to ensure that she is well taken care of, enjoys some quality of life and I am her voice and she needs to be heard.
  • Jenny

    NSW
    Child with a disability
  • Wayne Charles

    VIC
    l care for my partner and l am strong believer in the old saying what goes around comes around. l do what l can to care and look after Pete the way l would expect some one to care and look after me.
  • Margaret

    QLD
    I'm part time carer / full time guardian for my 32 yr old daughter who has down syndrome, I'm a single mum for 15 yrs now. Tho she is in supported accommodation due to my ill health n lack of gaining support to keep us together . This has become positive way for us to live. We have regular contact via phone, n weekend visits .. Why do I care - god given duty he gave me a gift and she is my daughter she has various health issues, but being Diabetic type 1 means I have overseen her condition for 21 yrs now. She tells everyone to ring mum if they wanna know anything cause " Mum Knows best"
  • bev Giebel

    QLD
    Caring is like breathing a deep pure breath. It expresses our humanity, it makes us all strong together, and links us with the rest of society. Without supporting or caring for each other, life holds little joy, just isolation. We are all connected, and those lucky enough to be able to express this through caring are blessed. After all, the carer can easily become the "Care-ee".
  • Irene Taylor

    QLD
    My husband Trevor, had a massive stroke 21 years ago, he spent 3 months in Toowoomba base Hospital, and they had to teach him how to sit up, and stand and then walk, with the aide of a walking stick. He has no use of his left arm and hand and can only walk on his left leg, by moving the leg from the hip. He can't walk far and has to use the wheelchair. We were in the middle of a big drought on our farm when Trevor had the stroke, so things were very hard for some time. Our family were a wonderful support for Trevor and I, without which we wouldn't be still on our farm.
  • Amy Lords

    QLD
    I started caring for my partner when he first moved in with me in 2008. I was only 23 at the time and unsure of what I could do to assist him through his mental illness and addictions. Through caring for him I have gained an understanding of how addiction and mental illness is so entwined and needs to be treated together with constant support, love, guidance, and the correct treatment. 10 Years later and I am still caring for my now husband. I care because I love him, he is worth every hard day and night, and he brings me joy and happiness just being here with me and seeing him smile.
  • Ruth

    QLD
    My partner had a major heart attack and aquired brain injury in Jan 18. It's not been a long time but for us it's been a enormous change and struggle to get the assistance we need, i'm his carer because no one else is going to step up and fight for our quality of living day to day, week to week, month by month. At 43 years old this is not something we thought about, or lives have stopped while we deal with this...more information and help needs to be available to all carers.
  • Rachel

    QLD
    I care for my 6 year old son that has multiple disabilities. Jacobs syndrome, ADHD. Autism and conduct disorder. Even with the best team of professionals, my son is a rare and extremely complex case that nobody has answers for. So why do I care ? I am my sons only voice. I am his only strength to fight for a better life for him. My motto is Giving up is NOT a option! I am not a Marter , I am a Mother who simply just wants a better life for their child.
  • Marion English

    QLD
    My husband gas Vascular Dementia I looked after him for nearly 5 years then I crashed with Bells Palsy no family support available so he had to go into full care. Once I was back on track I visited nearly every 2nd day took him out on day trips and as time progressed and I watch the appalling behaviour of some staff members cleaner included and because we dare save some money the government then wanted their share so had to pay just on $100 per. The food disgrace our neighbours dogs were better. I could not sit by and watch all this so NOW have brought him back home difficult as
  • lyn stokes

    QLD
    I am a carer for my son he is a double transplant recipient as well as has trouble just living ,he has server anxiety and has trouble with doing most things that other people take for granted,he is 48 years old and is inneed of my help to do most things ,for the last 9 years since his dad died i have been his only carer ,i,m 70 in january next year so it can be very hard on both of us,i do this because i love my son and he loves me so we stick together and try to help each other ,carering is i job that takes on lots of different things and at times it can get very hard .
  • Julie Couzens

    QLD
    Ive been a carer for over 30 years of various family members through various issues. car crash/cancer/drug addiction/bipolar. not to mention the fights and battles for help that never comes. Why do I care ?? because they were family If I didn't who would ?? Now 3 of the 4 family members are dead. Now I find I need care. Who will care for a carer ?? no one it seems. I dont qualify
  • Baba

    QLD
    Its participation in Joy, love, Hope, shared smiles and improved quality of life for one + everyone around them. I am a carer for an elderly parent and a Foster childCarer Support person. There is no joy in the world comparable to seeing someone who couldn't do things for years suddenly take back their independence and see real hope of a future without fear and failure being the first words to come to mind. Resilient recipients who grab a hold of this are such a joy. Their new found self esteem and happiness spills over and brings satisfaction to all, that money couldn't buy even if it tried.
  • Sue Downey

    QLD
    I was carer for my husband for six years until he died in 2009. He had dementia and it was the most distressing, debilitating time of our life together. I know firsthand the pain Carers experience watching a loved one change into someone they don’t know. My life was put on hold. I had moral, emotional, physical support from family and Carers Qld. It prevented me from falling apart. I empathise with and understand the journey Carers find themselves on. I have nothing but praise for them. Sometimes all they need is someone to listen.
  • Pamela Weldon

    QLD
    I care for my elderly parents as well as I possibly can because it's the right thing to do as well as the desire to see them happy and supported in their old age. It also gives me a great sense of achievement to know that I can help when they are so in need. Elderly people also prefer as much as possible their family to care for them if they can as it removes fear and anxiety from their life if they can depend on someone for their needs.
  • Mel

    QLD
    Why wouldn't I care? My son didn't choose to be born with a disability but he faces challenges every day. I will provide whatever support I can for him so that he reaches his potential in life. Sure, this has had an impact on our family financially and emotionally, I no longer work full time, we relocated closer to services, our social life has changed, we plan our outings more carefully, there are more appointments to attend and worries about fitting in at school, but if I didn't make these sacrifices, things would be much worse. I care because it is what my son deserves.
  • Jodie Moss

    WA
    I have two amazing children who are Autistic. I care for them because they are my world, my love and they are amazing. The world is a better place because they are here, they make others smile, are helpful and caring, and I’m honoured to be their mum
  • Jody Hamilton Kincaid

    VIC
    Simply because I love him. My husband now loves with PTSD and will never return to work as a direct result of his Volunteer CFA duties on Black Saturday. We have adapted our lives, eating style, tv/movie veiwing, social activities and general routines as a result, but we wirk well as a team and I am blessed with that. Sadly we are about to snuff out another life dream and sell our rural plot to move into town. He simply cannot manage, summer is a nightmare, and smoke on the horizon is paralyzing. So town we go......Carers week is amazing, thank you for reading. Jody
  • Margaret Troyahn

    QLD
    We have been married for 53 years. My husband John has lung problems and is on oxygen 24/7. This is the ‘in sickness’ part of our wedding vows. I look after him except for 3 times a week when OzCare ladies come to shower him. Luckily we don’t have lots of problems and every day, after lunch, I go into another room to watch Netflix while he watches Foxtel. Gives us a daily break. It’s just like respite for a couple of hours.
  • Lisa

    TAS
    I am a carer to my 2 boys my eldest is 10 and has had excema that covers his entire body since birth coupled with life threatening allergies and 75% deaf i currently receive a carers payment for him, my second child is 7 and has adhd and odd my husband and i are lucky to make a week without him being sent home from school we both work i am only part time but work for me is my only outlet in the last 3 weeks my son was suspended 3 times we live in a very remote area on an island which you can only fly on and off and have no support as family live elsewhere its a real challenge at times
  • Katrina

    ACT
    Carers contribute so much to the social and economic wellbeing of our communities and Australia as a whole. It's so important that we value and support carers for the critical role they play. Their selfless and dedicated work is so often overlooked, we need to make sure we look after our carers!

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National Carers Week 2018 is an initiative of Carers Australia and is funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services